Self Diagnosis on the course is a DISASTER!!!!

Now it’s one thing if you are a professional golfer.

It’s also something else when you are working on something with a pro who knows what he is doing, you are working on one thing and you are diagnosing “yea or nay.”

Simple.

What I am talking about is mid to high handicappers spouting a merry go round plethora of mistakes and cliches they are making after every bad shot, then trying to make a different adjustment after each bad shot.

I understand the need to correct for bad shots, but it is so far beyond ridiculous to make detailed, individual, self diagnosis based on the exact miss.

I’ll let you in on a few secrets.

You are making the exact same mistake on every single miss. Chunks, thins, hooks, slices…etc. All that is different is that the compensation you have learned to make over the years is working with different levels if ineffectiveness.

I will repeat and add, YOU ARE MAKING THE SAME EXACT BAD SWING ON ALL YOUR DIFFERENT MISSES…AND YOUR GOOD SHOTS TOO.

The only difference is how effective or ineffective your learned compensation is.

Secret #2. In order for self diagnosis to work, three things have to happen.

1. You have to diagnose the exact proper swing error from your miss and your feel.

2. You have to figure out the exact right fix in the right part of your swing that will work in sequence properly with the rest of your swing.

3. You have to implement the exact right fix at exactly the right time and sync it up with the rest of your swing that is used to attempting to be in sync with the bad move you have been making all along.

Guess what the chances are off pulling off all 3 of those things in the middle of a round while playing a hole?????

Let’s not factor in the extra pressure of a 3 dollar nassau, or the embarrassment of not only being bad at golf, but having everyone laugh at you for being incredibly wrong with your fix when you produce an even worse miss.

The obvious answer is ZEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEERO!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Stop Golf Digesting yourself to death on the course. Work on a few simple feels on the range to try and make yourself better. On the course, accept the fact that even Tour players winning majors hit bad shots. Hitting a golf ball perfectly is hard. Hitting it decent is hard. Heck, just avoiding a whiff is hard. Actually, swinging a golf club dozens of times trying to get the ball in a hole 1/4 of a mile away without hurting yourself,someone else or a plate glass window is near impossible.

Get setup as well as you can, try to do your best at getting your body to move together…and go try and find the ball. Bad shots are part of the game for great golfers. You are a bad golfer and realize you are going to hit bad shots and trying to adjust differently for each bad shot you hit, is only going to make you hit more bad shots and the bad shots are going to be worse.

Previous

Next

11 Comments

  1. Calvin

    I have probably read an encyclopedia Brittannica worth of golf instruction and I have never seen this. Brilliant. Might give me indigestion.

    “You are making the exact same mistake on every single miss. Chunks, thins, hooks, slices…etc. All that is different is that the compensation you have learned to make over the years is working with different levels if ineffectiveness.

    I will repeat and add, YOU ARE MAKING THE SAME EXACT BAD SWING ON ALL YOUR DIFFERENT MISSES…AND YOUR GOOD SHOTS TOO.” Scheinblum

    Reply
  2. Bob Saunders

    Agreed. Monte, consider using that quote in your advertising.
    It is fresh!

    Reply
  3. woody

    “Hitting a golf ball perfectly is hard. Hitting it decent is hard. Heck, just avoiding a whiff is hard.”

    There are two ways to look at this. 1) It is absolutely true. A couple of days ago I saw a competitor on the Champions Tour cold-top a shot in the fairway. It was as bad as the worst of your readers could produce.

    2) It is horrible psychology, and it leads to one of the fundamental wrong assumptions of golf, the idea that you have to micromanage the club to the ball.

    Good players have a fundamentally different approach than hackers. They are involved with athletics, and the hackers are involved with engineering.

    Better players, whether they know it or not, are bringing their center to the ball. Hackers are trying to get speed from their hands and arms.

    A highly ranked instructor named Mike Hebron wrote a book called, “The Inside Moves the Outside.” It’s probably flawed, but the concept is solid.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      I do not believe it is horrible psychology in the context I used it.

      Reply
      • woody

        Agree. But, when someone actually steps up to a ball, it should be with the confidence that it will zip off the clubface, on the intended line. Uh-huh.

        As far as golf being hard…well, someone called it the most studied subject ever, and the results of all that study is pretty much disinformation.

        Reply
    • Calvin

      I think that quote is simply realism.

      Psychology might enter into it for some but old mossy-backs like me understand that hitting elite golf shots is as much a knack as anything else. For instance, try and engineer juggling. Engineering be-damned. 🙂

      Reply
      • woody

        “hitting elite golf shots” …well, you might not be able to get an elite time in the 100 meter dash either.

        But, I’ll bet you’ve hit shots that seem effortless and seem to fly forever, tracking on your line. You know it’s there, but wish you were more consistent with it.

        Use the salesman’s approach with theories. Each time you discard one, you’re one “NO” closer to a “YES.”

        Reply
  4. denozzoa

    Monte, I just found your blog a couple of months ago and I’m really enjoying it. Its refreshing to hear someone talk about golf in terms of commons sense as apposed to mechanics, swing theories, and methodologies. Keep up the good work.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Thank you. I made it complicated for myself for too long, now I am trying to make it as easy as i can for others.

      Reply
  5. Jason

    Hey Monte, you and Shawn Clement are the only one’s that “get it” when it comes to the common sense approach. Why is it called common sense anyway when it’s so rare? It should be referred to as rare sense LOL.

    Reply
  6. Andrew from Addis

    Such good thoughts Monty. After a short while off I had a horrible day on the course today. After three near perfect opening holes (3 missed birdie putts but tap in pars), everything went pear shaped. 3 doubles on the front, two OBs on the back – but I thought of you.

    Worked on release on plane and getting the setup right. Really tried hard not to think about the swing. Hopefully it will come back soonest.

    Andrew from Addis

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Share This
X