I made a huge mistake-Edit at bottom for fitness experts

Please don’t take any of the following as an excuse. Quite the opposite, this is me taking responsibility for not working hard enough.

I am in terrible shape and it is preventing me from being at my best for the Remax this week.

I had no idea I was still capable of elite speeds with the golf club, but I am. I thought at my age, 125-130 was all I was capable of.

I was incorrect. I am still capable of getting into the mid to high 130’s, but my body is incapable of the endurance or sustaining the strain of doing that more than once or twice per day…or at all some days.

To be more clear, it hurts and I get tired. It is lucky for me there is an off day in between competition days or I would have had no chance at all. I need a full day to recover after swinging that hard 30 or 40 times.

If I want to be the #1 guy in the senior division and competitive in the open division, I can, but I need to spend the entire year getting in better physical shape. I am probably 210-215 pounds and 20%+ body fat.

If I can get to near 10% body fat, get physically stronger and more flexible and in better cardio shape, I would be more capable of being a dominant hitter again.

At the level I am hitting, I should at least make the final 8, anything after that is about getting the right bounce, the right match up and having someone like Mobley or Ciurilini not hitting their best shot and that pains me.

I was the best there was and I only got beat when someone else hit their career ball or got the right bounce.

Again, not a defeatist attitude or a pre-excuse, I am still capable of winning and will do my damndest to do so.

I am just saying I should have worked harder off the golf course the last year and I would have been better had I done so.

The same mistake will not be made next year.

I have made this pledge before…there just needs to be a follow through at some point.

EDITED-Obviously I am ignorant on fitness topics and I appreciate all of the comments so far and hope for more.

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34 Comments

  1. North

    Getting old sux. Getting back in shape just gets tougher and tougher. Good Luck, hope you get that bounce.

    Reply
  2. Joe

    under 10% is 6-pack territory. I don’t think you need to be that lean. Around 13-16% should be fine. You aren’t that far off.

    Reply
  3. Roy Gilley

    Hard to do, but if you cut out sweets – skip trick-or-treat this year! – that might help a lot. I’ll be rootin’ for ya.

    Reply
  4. casvolsmu (@casvolsmu)

    Monte, 10% BF at your age is really hard, especially coming from 20%. At 13%, you can see your upper abs, that is elite fitness. If you are serious, you need to go to almost a PSMF diet. That’s the only way to lose that much body fat while not losing massive amounts of muscle. It becomes a fat-loss scenario vs. a weight loss scenario. Think about it–20% at 210 is 42 ponds of fat. To lose 21 pounds of fat, while not losing any lean body mass, is harder than you can imagine. I went from 240, 26% after 2 back surgeries to 185, 12% in about 6 months. But it was by literally starving myself. 800-1100 calories a day, 90% of it protein. It is BRUTAL. Starving. And weight training is unbelievably difficult without the carbs for energy–unfortunately it is the only way to lose that much BF% in a limited (less than 2 years) time frame.

    Reply
  5. Mono

    Hey Monte, body fat is 90% what you are eating, 10% what you are doing. Check out the paleo diet books. Simply put stop eating grains, beans, anything with milk or sugar. These foods are horrible for insulin levels, which when they spike store fat, when they are normal your body with burn fat constantly. It’s much easier than starving yourself. This is a very expensive way to eat, you will need several new smaller sized cargo shorts after a few months.

    Reply
    • mike

      couldnt agree more with this post Monte, try reading the Primal Blueprint, or go online to marksdailyapple.com. Also remember what John Kruk said ‘ im not an athlete lady Im a baseball player” Your swing will be more important than your fitness level.

      Reply
  6. casvolsmu (@casvolsmu)

    Even eating Paleo will only help so much. It MUST be protein heavy, otherwise the LBM will be negatively affected. Paleo IS great for maintenance, however. And yes, the cost is prohibitive. Fresh lean meat and green veggies are expensive. Protein, protein, protein if you want to drop “fat”, and not drop “weight.”

    Reply
    • casvolsmu (@casvolsmu)

      Nothing better than IF. After I shed all the excess, I started Paleo and IF hardcore. Love it.

      Reply
  7. Dan

    Like people said above…paleo type diet is the way to go. For strength, flexibility, endurance, explosiveness, etc., try crossfit at a well coached gym. For mobility, injury prevention go to http://www.mwod.com and watch all of “KStars” videos. He really has some great ways of keeping the hips and shoulders “supple” which is huge for the golf swing

    Reply
  8. banner12

    Monte,

    This I don’t understand. With Frank you are always saying, “He should win 2 or 3 times this year, be a top player on the Tour again, etc.” When it comes to yourself, it’s “I’ll be lucky to be able to pick up the club, let alone make a swing, etc.”

    Why do you have unrealistic OPTIMISTIC expectations for him and unrealistic PESSIMISTIC expectations for yourself? You are both mid-40’s(and all that comes with it: declining abilities, heavier, not as sharp, etc.) and are competing in the events you were once in the top level. Shouldn’t expectations be about the same?

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Not saying anything more than Frank will win again and I am not the favorite and should be…and would have been had I worked harder on my physical conditioning.

      Reply
      • banner12

        Fair enough. Good Luck!

        Reply
  9. woody

    Being in great shape will only take you so far. Joe Miller apparently works out, but he’s only been a factor once. And then, he only got one in the grid in the finals.

    Coordination and timing will get you in the ballpark. From there, there’s nuthin’ like a bit a luck. A good pairing, a puff of wind, a good bounce. Who says it can’t happen? Look at the final day of this year’s Ryder Cup. Give it your best, and what happens, happens.

    Good luck. And don’t forget to breathe.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Joe Miller doesn’t have a consistent swing. All I said is my body is not in good enough shape to perform my maximum speed.

      Reply
    • sbk

      LOL. He was beat in the semi-finals last year by the eventual champ. Also a final 8 in 2008. So, 2008 – final 8, 2010 – Champion, 2011 3rd. Non-factor?

      Reply
      • woody

        Er, maybe a bit of a factor. Didn’t he lose some of those matches by getting none in the grid?

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzJIBDwqCEQ (1:26) Joe Miller + Watermelon

        This is why I would never be in a gallery lining the fairway, maybe not within 200 yards of the tee. The gallery at Re/Max sits behind. Good choice.

        Reply
      • sbk

        2008 he went OB. 2011 he lost 459-452 while putting 3 in the grid. I agree he can be wild but you have to put a few in the grid to make the final 8 3 times in 4 years.

        Reply
  10. meateater

    Lot of nonsense in these replies. Diets, etc won’t do it, not at this level. You need a steroids cycle or two. You can get very strong and lean. Quickly. Find someone who knows what they’re doing to guide you. Don’t think most of the other top guys aren’t using. They are about as clean as Lance Armstrong.

    Let the hate posts commence…

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      I won’t lie. It was a part of the sport in the 90’s, but I know they have testing now.

      I laughed at the guys who did it and I still beat…LOL.

      Reply
      • meateater

        Testing is a joke. Even if it’s world class Olympics style testing, which I seriously doubt LD is. Testing cannot possibly be effective unless it is year round, unannounced, like they do in tennis for example. Youcan go on and off a steroids cycle and be clean for a test. I wouldn’t doit myself, but then I’m not a world class competitor where 1 or 2 percent is the difference in winning or losing. There are some horror stories, but there are also thousands of people who use them safely. It’s not like yiu are training to become an NFL lineman. Whatever, but I bet a lot of the guys you’ll be going up against are using.

        Reply
        • Monte Scheinblum

          You are probably correct on all counts.

          Although a few got nabbed I heard. Testing is more an intelligence test than anything else.

          Reply
    • woody

      There’s a price to pay. Plus, I think they shrink your gonads. Let’s jump into the Wayback Machine:

      http://espn.go.com/classic/biography/s/Alzado_Lyle.html

      “Lyle Alzado’s ticket to the NFL was anabolic steroids. An undersized player in high school, he began experimenting with the muscle-building drugs in college and never stopped. …

      “…At the height of his steroid and human growth hormone abuse, Alzado estimated he spent $30,000 a year on the drugs…His second wife, Cindy, blamed the breakup of their marriage on his mood swings caused by steroids.

      “…After years of denying he used steroids, Alzado came clean in a first-person story for Sports Illustrated in July 1991… “It was addicting, mentally addicting,” Alzado wrote of his steroid use.

      “… in 1992, seven years after playing in his last regular-season game, Alzado died from brain lymphoma… Alzado was certain the drugs were responsible for his cancer. He became a symbol of the dangers of steroid abuse.”

      Reply
  11. thomas

    Monte, did you notice how you were just like the hacks you always criticize when you started talking about the bodyfat? Should I add a LOL as you always do when you want to make someone appear an idiot.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Yep…and I never try and portray hacks as idiots. Hacks are the victims (and I was in that category at one time). The people that are idiots are the ones that are supposed to know better and spout nonsense anyway.

      Reply
  12. craig

    Good luck with the fitness and body composition goals Monte! I’m sure you might have an inkling but in case you don’t, the fitness/nutritition/strength industry is equally as full of charlatans and sales pitches as the golf swing/equipment industry. Too many single factor solutions marketed to solve multi-variable problems. In my opinion, the guys at the TPI are on the right track with golf fitness and the previously recommended MWOD videos by Kelly Starrett are also very good. Hope you’re successful in finding a truly expert consultant for your specific fitness and nutrition needs!

    Reply
  13. been there

    Looking at the field, you have a favorable draw. You also have a few things going for you. One is that the division is spread out over 3 days. Normally its two. If you stay in the winners bracket, the most number of rounds in any day is 3 and thats the finals. There are some big hitters in this division absent. ( I understand that there have been a number of people that had to pull out.) so the field is without Wilson, Hagen, and Kraj ( all 200 plus mph BS guys). This is about as good as it can get for you. good luck – maybe we share a tee together

    Reply
  14. Dave

    Don’t start running. You injure yourself. Do some High intensity interval stuff like crossfit type stuff. you can be in and out of the gym in 40 mins (warmup included in that). Just go to the gym ready mentally.

    Reply
  15. Tom

    Monte what would recommend to a beginning or struggling golfer? Right — get a good coach, and ignore the crap. You need to find a good trainer to work with. Preferably a caveman that competes in long drive contests.

    Reply
      • Tom

        Glad I could pay you one back. You advised me to abandon my golf instructor and you were right.

        Reply
  16. Tim

    I’m a hack golfer, but I know my way around strength training and fitness. I would describe the industry as substantially worse than the state of golf instruction. At least most of those club pros giving bad advice can still play great golf.

    Finding a good “coach” is great advice, but they’re hard to find. I would avoid almost anybody who refers to themselves as a “trainer.” There always obviously exceptions, but trainers are generally terrible.

    I would look for somebody who coaches olympic weightlifting in your area. I am not saying that you should necessarily be undertaking olympic style training, but I am yet to encounter an olympic coach who did not stress proper form and teaching. They are usually excellent teachers and as obsessed with their sport as you are. Plus, most of their clients are not olympic hopefuls, but athletes from other sports looking to get stronger, faster, and more explosive, just like you. Avoiding injury is going to be top priority. They will know how to incorporate weight training with your sport specific training in an intelligent way.

    I would not just show up at your local crossfit. Crossfit is not terrible at all, but I don’t think anybody should learn how to lift in a crossfit group setting. Not nearly enough emphasis on form. Plus, they pride themselves in being generalists when it comes to training, which is the exact opposite of what somebody in your position should want. Your goals could not be more specific.

    Whoever gets you as a client is probably going to be thrilled. You’re a professional athlete with what seems to be little weightlifting experience. Those don’t roll through the door on a daily basis, and if you are inexperienced, you are going to improve a lot very early on.

    Reply
    • casvolsmu (@casvolsmu)

      Agree. A legitimate athlete, who has never actually trained correctly, will see EXCEPTIONAL increases extremely quickly.

      Reply

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