A real life example of why feel isn’t real and

The right arm has a huge impact on wrist angle and lag.

One of my victims has had an issue of getting the upper body in front and throwing it away forever. I told him shallowing angle of attack by getting behind it first, then his arms needed to link up.

He was a former lag holder to no avail.

Monday, on a hunch, I told him to throw the lag away on purpose. Guess what happened? His right arm sped up, linked up and produced more forward shaft lean then he has ever had. Well, wouldn’t call it shaft lean yet…how about less throw away? 😀

Notice how much better the body angles are on the picture on the right (after). Right foot hasn’t lost its leverage with the ground, right knee in more solid position, better tilt and less throw away. Notice how on the left, the right wrist is straight, while on the right, there is still angle in right wrist.

Oh, the irony. Can’t tell you how many lag holders I see actually throwing it away massively because it slows their right arm down.

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28 Comments

  1. Bob Saunders

    Monte,

    Excellent point. Feel is not real.

    Question – you used the term linked up twice in this post and I am still not sure what you mean. Help! Thanks,

    Reply
      • Bob Saunders

        Thank you.

        Reply
  2. woody

    I don’t know how far he’s trying to hit it, but gurus tend to recommend that the left foot be a little more open at setup. Your guy might have a restriction, especially in the frame to the right.

    Left leg is going to want to turn in the downswing, and even more during the follow-through.

    Watney, driver setup:

    http://www.golfdigest.com/images/instruction/2012-03/insl01_watney_ss.jpg

    Reply
    • Mike Divot

      Gurus also recommend turning in a barrel, holding the lag, keeping the head still, etc …

      Haven’t you learned anything from reading this blog?

      There is no “one size fits all”. The flared left foot is good for some players and not for others.

      Reply
      • Robert Johansson

        Actually there is one size fits all.
        Once you understand how generalizations works within a model set and its instruction, for example two dominators are grip-pressure and tempo, once applied to any swing system and then it allows the player to sequence things.
        so those variables and a few others can be used as one size fit any system.

        Reply
  3. Hank Beech

    i see all kinds of video’s on keeping the left arm straight, what about one on the right arm on the backswing, i seem to have my right arm break down and goes around my right big time

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Many people fold their right arm too quickly.

      I often say to keep it straight longer.

      Reply
      • atyler16

        This is a problem of mine which I’m sure you will see in a few days. I conquer it for awhile and it creeps back in. I feel like I can I overdo the straight right arm at times to the point of swaying off the ball, need to find the happy medium.

        Reply
  4. Be Quiet Woody

    Woody either wants to be you or he just wants to have the following you do Monte. It’s so annoying that he constantly challenges every single thing you put forth. Hogan this, gurus that. Seems like you try to hijack everything and show off your knowledge Woody. Have you thought of starting your own blog where you can post your thoughts?

    Reply
    • Mike Divot

      Woody once risked his life to save mine, and I couldn’t call myself his friend if I wasn’t willing to do the same. Now who’s with me?

      Reply
      • calvin

        Rock on Woody. I like learning from you.

        Reply
    • Robert Johansson

      without difference of opinion how would you actually learn anything?

      Reply
      • woody

        No, no. Everyone should just accept authority. One person can know everything there is to know about golf.

        P.S. I wasn’t telling Monte anything he didn’t already know. Now, wouldn’t it be stupid to try to “fix” everything you see at one time? And, who is to say that the right-frame above wasn’t the only time in his whole life that the golfer created that particular restriction?

        Reply
    • David

      Kind of ironic how we should blindly follow someone(Monte) who says not to blindly follow someone(PGA teachers).

      Reply
      • calvin

        Very well said.

        There are thousands of golf ‘experts’ and you are extremely lucky if one of them can help you. I have asked several pros if they could identify anything like a transcendent moment that lifted them out of hackdom into playerville; the answer is always six months or more of intense daily practice. If you want to be really good you’ve got to really work.

        Reply
      • Robert Johansson

        There are many ways you can make it work for the tour, most however is band aid that needs fixing, Rory lost his swing for example, Yani tseng lost her game with a swing change and even if there are several ways one can approach tour level golf, there isnt many short cuts, a simpler more consistent swing helps but still you need putting to make those scores and then the mentality and then the dedication to make it work.
        Most amateurs dont practice enough and if they do it tends to be making most worse and seldom better unless you spend months on it.

        Then its become to much theory, and swing gets you as far then its other things like decision making, stick to the plan, ability to press on and score low and personally I dont understand how they can loose their swings and only reason its to complicated for them to do consistently and mainly due to bad theory like in Yani tsengs case.

        Reply
  5. Robert Evans

    I agree with be quiet woody. Woody, you should start your own blog! Great article Monte. Thanks:)

    Reply
    • woody

      I’m going to make your day and take about a year or more vacation from here. After all, how often does someone get a chance to make so many people happy with one simple act?

      Before I go, I’ll give you the secret of golf…from a horseback riding blog. (By the way, Monte knows what it is.)

      XXXX is the “missing-link” riders must learn to use in order to feel their horses’ movement and to follow the directions of their riding instructors. By mastering the use of XXXX riders will be able to develop self-carriage and have independent seats.

      Most instructors began riding when they were young and learned through trial and error on a body level. This is called “unconscious competence.”

      How riding instructors use their bodies is different than how many of their students use their bodies–but most do not consciously know what they are using. Riding instructors use XXXX when they ride.

      XXXX = I’ll let Monte make some money off of it, if he can figure out a way.

      Reply
      • Monte Scheinblum

        Woody, I don’t get offended when you disagree with me, so why should you be when someone disagrees with you?

        Reply
      • woody

        Not offended, just trying to spread joy. Besides, he’s right. I know the truth when I see it, and I’ve used too many words here.

        I’ll check in next year to see how things are going. Good luck in Long Drive, and with Frank.

        Reply
      • Chris S.

        I personally think that like having another set of eyes, woody offers a different view of the same thing. Theres a thousand different ways to achieve the same result with a golf swing and thanks to the English language theres a thousand different ways to say it. Different feels to accomplish the same thing. Keep up the good work Monte and Woody.

        Reply
      • mat

        Hey Woody, don’t go!! From what I’ve seen your comments are reasonable and polite, pity to lose that from Monte’s blog. When I want to listen to bitchin’, whingin’ and abusin’, I can always go to WRX…

        Reply
    • IPM

      FWIW, I don’t think Woody should leave. However, I do find it somewhat annoying at times. At other times it’s helpful to hear some of the historic perspectives he brings. But I come here to hear Monte’s thoughts. After almost giving up the game, Monte helped me love golf again by giving me the tools to a consistent golf swing. Plus, it’s Monte’s blog, if he doesn’t mind, then who am I to disagree.

      Reply
  6. blacksox

    If you have created space and freedom for the arms on the downswing the right elbow will naturally flow close to and in front of the right hip. More often that not, players obsessed with lag and angles will lose the natural dynamic that creates room on the way down and thru. If that is the case, I agree 100 percent with Monte. Let the right arm throw and straighten to square the club to the intended path. Once that is identified, then figure out how to create leverage on the way down from a weight shift and a turn instead of pulling the club from the top and creating false leverage. After all, if you are trying to shoot 75 or 76 for the first time, there is nothing wrong with hitting a 7 iron 155 yards to the center of the green consistently.

    Reply
  7. calvin

    Another ‘expert’ with early release:

    Reply
  8. rojoass

    And he huffed & he puffed & he blew his swing to smithereens……..
    I googled “SWINGCRACK” & guess what explodes?

    The Official defenition of “SWINGCRACK” « rojoass

    Reply
  9. Cyd

    Mike Austin wanted a throwing motion from the top. Austin did not believe in trying to hold any angles or lag. Trying to hold angles and delay the hit and maintain lag only slowed down the swing. All of that should occur naturally.

    Jack Nicklaus – “I can assure you I never tried to delay the hit or retain my wrist cock. That happens naturally, if you start with a proper grip, maintain a light grip pressure and keep your arms relaxed. It’s impossible to release the club too early in the downswing — as long as you move to your left side and swing the club from inside the target line.”

    Spot on advice to your student Monte.

    Reply

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