Scoring is about understanding how it easy it is

(Tuesday and Wednesday are going to be a two and possibly larger series on the how to see if creating artificial lag, swinging inside/out, helping the ball in the air, etc. are affecting your swing…and how to fix it. The titles are “High and Low Hands” and “Close the Open Window.” Players of all skill levels and want of technical understanding will enjoy the posts and videos. They will be very informative and most likely very helpful to all. As I go through this journey of both technical and self discovery, the more I find out that the important factors in the golf swing are not what we are being told about by the mainstream golf gurus. These two videos/posts will deal with just before impact and impact…the only places that really matter.)

(back to today’s post)

It doesn’t matter if you are trying to breaking 90/80/70 for the first time or shoot multiple rounds int he 60’s as a pro, it’s all the same concept. If you are trying to break 90, all you have to do is find a way to make bogey on every hole. That is not difficult. If you are trying to shoot in the 60’s as a pro, all you have to do is birdie half the par 5’s, make one other putt and par the rest. Four days of that, you shoot 12 under and that makes you million and million of dollars. Again, not difficult.

If you are not achieving that level, you either don’t know how easy it is, or in some cases (like mine), you have forgotten how easy it.

When you are too busy grinding on your swing, you lose track of the main goal…shooting the lowest score possible. I have had this problem for a number of years and my main priority is to change this approach.

As soon as I am able to make this change, my scores will reflect it immediately and so will all of yours. Scoring is an intangible skill that only few are elite, but all can attain a satisfactory level of competence.

However, you can’t attain this skill if you are busy with a 14 step swing checklist. The range if for working on a 1 or 2 step swing checklist, the course is for working on how can you get it in the hole in as few strokes as possible.

I was actually decent at this skill this week. One would say, “Monte, if your scoring skill was great this week and you shot 147 for two days, you aren’t very good.”

That would be correct and incorrect at the same time. I was pretty much awful at every tangible facet of the game this last week.

Driving…..D+
Long Irons…..D
Mid Irons…..F
Short irons…..C-
Wedges…..C+
Chipping…..B (I butchered a few really easy up and downs, but I made quite a few spectacular chips, so it about evens out to a B)
Putting…..B- (If green reading weren’t a part of this, I would have gotten an A, but it is, so B-)

Here is what is important for me and all of you. For 27 holes I kept it at even par. I only let the round get away from me when I started to press for birdies and made a few physical mistakes (OB, water ball and 3-putts when I got overly aggressive trying to make birdie).

I kept it at even par when I basically had nothing for one reason. I was trying to play golf, instead of making golf swings. If I can keep this up and only improve to the B range in all areas of my game, the mid to high 60’s are not far off and neither is the low end of your scoring range if you forget about executing swings.

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EDITED: This is a big part of it as well

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Posted by Bob34 on August 2, 2010 at 6:58 am edit

What I don’t understand is why it can seem easy and then the wheels just fall off? gwlee and I played Saturday and I cruised in on the front 9 with a 39 which is decent for me. I didn’t have any swing thoughts. Then the wheels fell off. I’d have atleast 1 bad shot per hole and the bogies started pileing up. I never did start thinking about how to swing the club but all the sudden all manner of bad stuff showed up, fats, thins, hooks, fades, it was ugly & I’m not sure what the heck happened…

Reply

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Posted by Monte Scheinblum on August 2, 2010 at 8:41 am edit

Bob, you have just asked the important question. The answer is, sometimes we are just bad golfers. It’s all relative, but from Tiger, all the way down to the worst beginner, we just don’t have it sometimes.

This usually creates a need to “fix” something and we must fight that urge to make a change every time we have one bad round or stretch of holes.

Now if it becomes a trend, then some maintenance might be required.

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12 Comments

  1. banchiline

    Looking forward to Tuesday & Wednesday . Looking forward to “high & low hands”.

    I came to a grand conclusion over the weekend as I watched some of all the golf being telecast……….some players swing the arms to turn the shoulders & some start to turn the shoulders & let the arm follow. Seems as if most from both groups don’t allow the arms to swing “up” enough…………then el stucko results.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      No one is immune to getting stuck, Tour players have just learned to manage it better.

      Reply
      • banchiline

        True , no one is immune. For instance , anyone besides me see Tom Kites hack finish Sunday in Seattle?

        The point to my original post was………it seems , & I could be off base here……..(it’s just my own observation & also a personal nemesis)………….that , regardless of ones “order” or thought process for the takeaway (back-swing) whether it be one-piece , turn everything back together , back to target , shoulders swing the arms , arms first then shoulders & so on………. most golfers don’t swing the arms up enough relative to the shoulders . I’m not advocating a flying elbow super up-right motion .

        I remember Monte saying in one video that the arms MUST come up . That comment rang a bell with me . Shoulders turning 90* to the spine & arms elevating . If you turn your shoulders parallel to your spine and the arms don’t come ‘UP” enough ……….look how flat & far behind you they get .

        I got in trouble for years trying to just “turn & turn” , or “1 piece take-away” , without giving much thought to what my arms were doing & still fight it to a degree. I got real flat , had no arm elevation & it’s a miracle I ever broke 80 .

        Now I’ve gone too far the other way & it’s turned into arms keep going after the shoulders stop , a lift , club floating at the top & right elbow collapse , then a lateral move towards the target with the upper body trying to get back down to the ball…….uuummmmmmmmm

        Reply
  2. Bob34

    What I don’t understand is why it can seem easy and then the wheels just fall off? gwlee and I played Saturday and I cruised in on the front 9 with a 39 which is decent for me. I didn’t have any swing thoughts. Then the wheels fell off. I’d have atleast 1 bad shot per hole and the bogies started pileing up. I never did start thinking about how to swing the club but all the sudden all manner of bad stuff showed up, fats, thins, hooks, fades, it was ugly & I’m not sure what the heck happened…

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Bob, you have just asked the important question. The answer is, sometimes we are just bad golfers. It’s all relative, but from Tiger, all the way down to the worst beginner, we just don’t have it sometimes.

      This usually creates a need to “fix” something and we must fight that urge to make a change every time we have one bad round or stretch of holes.

      Now if it becomes a trend, then some maintenance might be required.

      Reply
  3. Bob34

    Well, I didn’t have the urge to fix anything mostly cause I had no idea what to change 🙂 First bad shot in my mind was an anomaly, topped 3 wood. A couple of decent shots, then a hook, couple of decent shots then a slice, etc… Scrambled a couple of times for par but then I finished off with a good drive and a really good approach shot, lipped out a 12′ birdy putt and parred the hole rated as the hardest finishing hole in all Hampton Roads. Golf’s a wierd sport 🙂

    Reply
    • gwlee7

      I know exactly what happened to me Bob. I let the fact that the greens were slow, bumply, and super sandy from being aerated bug the shit out of me. Tee to green, I was my usual self but I was so hung up on the greens that I didn’t chip and putt well at all and that was that.

      So, I come back home and this morning I shot 74 with one birdie, three bogeys, and 14 pars. It is a wierd game for sure.

      Reply
      • Bob34

        That is good scroing bud! Good luck today in the club championship!

        Reply
  4. smittygolf

    Do you have general guidelines for grading? Fairways hit percentage, # of 3 putts, etc.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      No, because difficulty of the course and setup skew stats a lot, so I just give an overall grade.

      Reply
  5. Cal

    Thanks to this site my golf has seen a steady improvement this year and the main reason for the improvement has been an adherence to the basic tenet “cut out the claptrap and see what’s left”. My swing has got more consistent and my enjoyment for the game is back.

    Anyhow, this weekend I won the competition at my club, which means I’m back to a single figure handicap and all is well in my little world. The point here is that I remembered how I used to keep score in my head when I was a higher handicapper and applied the technique. For example, if my handicap allowed me a shot on the first hole and I parred it, I used to call that 1 under. However, when I got to be a lower handicap that technique went out the window and everything was measured against the par for the course and thus became a grind – a la Monte’s comments about how golfer’s expectations would result in 54s.

    Monte’s right, scoring is easy if you have the right attitude.

    Reply

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