The biggest problem for high handicappers…

is undoing misconceptions.

Getting past tired old cliches like “keep your head down” and “swing slow”…and the subconscious desire to help the ball in the air.

Once high handicappers understand what is basically right and what is basically wrong, they can find a middle ground that works for them.

The basically right things are posture, balance, rhythm and how to swing the club is individual.

Once these baseline ideas become clear, the “a-ha” moments come fast and furious.

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10 Comments

  1. S.

    “The basically right things…”

    –I think there are more basically right things in the downswing than in the backswing. In the backswing, of course there’s the setup. After that, all you have to do is end up “loaded” for action–and among pros there is significant variation with how they do it. I’d say that the torso has to turn, and the arms have to be swung up, and the right leg has to get loaded. If that stuff gets done, it’s probably enough.

    –The next thing is, as you say: “Getting past tired old cliches like “keep your head down” and “swing slow”…and the subconscious desire to help the ball in the air.”

    –But, there is a third element. The third part is to keep it athletic, and not too cerebral. For that you need a guru who has been there and has done that, can hit it into the next county, has 13 holes-in-one, can shoot low numbers, and can act as your B.S. meter to ward off other gurus.

    Reply
  2. Bob34

    “But, there is a third element. The third part is to keep it athletic, and not too cerebral. For that you need a guru who has been there and has done that, can hit it into the next county, has 13 holes-in-one, can shoot low numbers, and can act as your B.S. meter to ward off other gurus.”

    So true!

    I started a new years resolution thread in the forum for this very reason. In ref to the GOLFWRX blog post; like most people I like to talk about golf especially during the winter when it’s snowing outside like today and all I can do is talk about it 🙁 In doing so, I’ve often been caught up in what someone says has worked for them and who knows what thier handicap is. I will say though that advice from one or two of those high handicappers has been better than some of the “pro’s” I’ve taken lessons from and maybe that’s some of the reason people take advice from anybody. Golf pro’s more and more are not much different from snake oil salesmen.

    Reply
    • gwlee7

      Our “buddy” over there is now endorsing training aids.

      Reply
      • Bob34

        I saw that…

        I’m bummed. The weather has turned to crap the past couple of weeks and everything was really coming together with my game. It’s so friggen cold I can’t even hit balls into the net off the mat in the garage 🙁

        Reply
  3. banchiline

    Bob do you & Greg remember years ago I asked “that guy” ……..”What about a transition thought or better yet a drill for the transition ?”……..

    He told me I was whacked & any instructor that tried to teach transition wasn’t worth his salt ! Look how “his” stuff has morphed since then .
    He has taken lots of stuff & put his name on it as if it was invented by him . And it is constantly changing .
    He needs a used car lot………

    crack head!

    Reply
    • Bob34

      Yeah, it’s pretty unbelievable. It’s not surprising that there are very very few of the original people left at that site. I don’t know anyone that’s still there that could actually play decent golf…

      Speaking of folks taking advice from others on the net. To this day your advice to me from years ago (Play golf not golf swing) is probably the best I’ve ever received. I’ve had to relearn that lesson a few times over the years but I got it now 😉

      Reply
  4. gwlee7

    For steve Bishop:

    Chuck Quinton

    Reply
  5. Steve Bishop

    Ohhhh… CQ.

    Some of his video’s gave me good things to ponder in the past but I haven’t kept up on him.

    Reply

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