My take on Tiger and his accident.

For those of you who question, “who crashes their car at 2 AM without it being alcohol related?”

I have a pretty young wife, a baby and another on the way. I don’t drink and I have never crashed into a fire hydrant at 2 AM, but I understand how…and those of you with wives and/or small children…you understand how as well. 🙂

I have to fly to see the in-laws today and I want to crash into a fire hydrant so I can be treated for lacerations of the groin…so I won’t have to go and so I can’t have any more kids.

Just so you guys know how brave I am…my wife and my mother-in-law read my blog on occasion.

Previous

Next

4 Comments

  1. ric

    its all gonna go back to his repoted affair and his wife kicking his a$$!
    why else would the back window be broken unless she was chasing him and hit the back window, which distracted him and boom, no more fire hydrent

    Reply
  2. Steve Wood

    This isn’t to teach you how to golf. You can golf better than I can, blindfolded with one hand tied behind your back. This is just a suggestion about how to think about the golf swing in the simplest terms. You probably already do this, but maybe haven’t thought of it this way.

    I theorize that are only two things to think about: 1) your gloved hand, and 2) your torso. You want to keep the “torso” thought general, not specific. At times, your back might be more active, at times it will be the abdomen. You don’t care because your brain will direct this, based on what you are trying to do. The main purpose of the backswing is to wind-up your torso. The muscles in your back and abdomen are the power of the swing.

    Your torso begins the wind-up, moving your unified hands, with special emphasis on your gloved hand, because that has the most contact with the club. Your hands move out of your field of vision, keeping in sync with your torso, not speeding back or lagging behind. Your arms are passive, but are neither limp nor stiff. If your arms are doing something, you don’t know or care what it is.

    Once your torso begins moving your hands, you have no thoughts about positions, direction, swing-plane, weight-shift or wrist-cock. Your attention is completely on the ball, but you are not trying to constrain your head in any way.

    Any attempt to manipulate shoulders or arms with take your hands out of contact with your power source, the torso unwinding.

    After the torso wind-up is complete, the downswing starts from the top. Most of your body, from your right foot to your torso is focused on moving your unified hands, especially your gloved hand (which has the most contact), to the ball. If your arms are doing something, you don’t know or care what it is. Unwinding brings its own balance because turning your torso turns your hips. Any attempt to manipulate knees or hips is counter-productive. You don’t need a lower body move to start because unwinding your torso turns your hips.

    That’s it. Wind-up & unwind. Hands, especially gloved hand—and Ball. The club is just an extension of your hands. You don’t care about plane, lag, or follow-through.

    Would it work?

    Reply
  3. Steve Wood

    This is embarrassing. I sent you a note, not really relating to this thread, suggesting a way to “simplify” thinking about the golf swing. (If I could golf 1/2 as good as you, that would be great.) But I realized that I need a red-pencil, and this might never be done. At least you might get a laugh out of it, or figure out something that really does work, and also takes the guru-speak out of it. There is more of a front-back thing going on, I think, with the back doing most of the back-swing, and abdominal muscles powering most of the downswing. My final public attempt:

    I theorize that are two major things involved in the golf swing: 1) your gloved hand, and 2) your torso.

    The purpose of the backswing is to wind-up your torso, and also to move your hands into striking position. The muscles in your back and abdomen are the power of the swing. Your hands are “hanging” at address, so your back is more involved in swinging your hands up on the takeaway. Any attempt to manipulate shoulders or arms will take your hands out of contact with the power source, your torso.

    Your back begins the wind-up, swinging your unified hands, with emphasis on your gloved hand because that has the most contact with the club. Once your hands begin swinging, you have no conscious thoughts about positions, direction, swing-plane, weight-shift or wrist-cock. Your attention is completely on the ball, but you are not trying to constrain your head.

    Your hands move out of your field of vision, keeping in sync with your torso, not speeding back or lagging. Your arms are passive, but are neither limp nor stiff. If your arms are doing something, you don’t know or care what it is.

    After the torso wind-up is complete, the downswing starts. Most of your body, especially your abdominal muscles and right foot, is focused on moving your unified hands to the ball—with emphasis on your gloved hand, which has the most contact with the club.

    If your arms are doing something, you don’t know or care what it is. Unwinding brings its own balance because unwinding your lower-torso turns your hips. Any attempt to manipulate knees or hips is counter-productive.

    That’s it. Wind-up your torso (back) & unwind (front). Hands & Ball—especially the gloved hand. The club is just an extension of your hands.

    You aren’t thinking about plane, lag, or follow-through.

    Ha, ha, ha! Ain’t it great! Happy holidays!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Share This
X