Keeping the proper width in the swing

We have all heard about having a wide swing arc, low and slow, holding the lag, etc…well, all of these things change the width of your golf swing arc. The video will show how these things do that, and what to do to keep the arc constant.

A widening arc will often change your spine angle during the swing and a narrowing arc will steepen your angle of attack creating a “stuck” situation and all sorts of issues you don’t want. These are only a few of the problems not maintaining a constant arc will cause you.

As usual, this video will not be about the “right things” to do, but more about what wrong things to avoid allowing the right things to happen all by themselves.

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8 Comments

  1. Banner 12

    Monte,

    Love your videos BUT it would be nice to see you make a full swing hitting the ball when explaining a technique. The half swings and positions don’t make full sense unless one can see them incorporated in the full, actual swing.

    In face, you should make several full, actual swings using the wrong technique and using the proper technique to demonstrate each.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Banner12. I understand and agree. My lower back has been acting up and I am taking some time off right now from the range.

      Reply
    • carrera

      Submitted for consideration…when you demonstrate an incorrect action on your videos, like an OTT, like most/all instructors you overdo the action…making the move almost a caricature. People who see that say to themselves “I don’t do that” because they see the exaggerated flaw and don’t make the connection. Most of the OTT swings or loss of posture swings I see in decent players (the guys reading your blog, golfwrx, etc) are more subtle. Maybe you have to exaggerate things to make it obvious on video, but if the flaws were presented in a more “realistic” fashion then maybe more folks would see themselves in the move. Just my $0.02.

      Reply
      • Monte Scheinblum

        Very valid point. I need to do both. To show what it would actually looks like and the caricature to illustrate to those without a real knowledge of what I am talking about.

        How many times have you seen someone with an awful swing, but a perfect finish, get praise from people who don’t know what they are looking at?

        Reply
  2. Bogeydog

    Monte,

    i like this post as well. I’m curious though about the width on the way down. I have a book by golf digest called Perfect Your Swing. It has pictures of a lot of player’s swings from many angles. Some players appear to maintain width very well. Azinger, Els, Faldo, Elkington and Woods (with Butch). Some do not, like Kite, Love III, Mickelson, Singh and Norman.

    Seems like good ballstrikers and long and short hitters on both sides. Do you think this is because I’m missing something in your explanation, or do some simply have so much talent that it isn’t relevant.

    Thanks for posting all this stuff, I hope I’m not bugging you too much with all this stuff.

    Reply
    • Monte Scheinblum

      Nah, more than happy to clarify.

      I would be one to say that all 4 of them have underachieved in majors because of this. I can speak form experience that narrowing your swing on the way down starts to waver under extreme pressure.

      These 4 players you mentioned have given away more majors than the rest of golf history combined.

      I know this is a thesis driven answer, but if you made a list of players that gave away the most majors…these four would all easily be in the top 6 or 7.

      Reply
      • Bogeydog

        I didn’t even think about that when I wrote my other reply. Good point. I guess it would be safe to say that keeping width allows one to rely less on perfect timing to hit acceptable shots.

        Reply
        • Monte Scheinblum

          That is what I believe…probably what stunted my career, what I am going to work on after the first of the year and hopefully will give me one more chance. 🙂

          Reply

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